Posted on

Fulvic Minerals: What Are They And What Benefits Do They Provide?

Fulvic Minerals: What Are They And What Benefits Do They Provide?
Fulvic Minerals: What Are They And What Benefits Do They Provide?

Fulvic Minerals: What Are They And What Benefits Do They Provide?

 

Fulvic minerals are naturally derived elements that comes from decomposed organic matter.

These minerals contain Fulvic and humic acids that provide benefits to health and the body including boosting the immune system, decreasing inflammation, improving brain function, reducing fatigue, and aiding iron absorption.

Because of these benefits, a fulvic mineral supplement may be beneficial to add to your daily diet.

 

Where Do Fulvic Minerals Come From?

Fulvic minerals are natural, nontoxic, water-soluble elements found in decomposed organic matter.

This organic substance is developed slowly over time and normally formed from prehistoric plants that have taken centuries to fully decompose (1).

These substances come in several different types and go by many names, but the most common are shilajit – a sticky organic substance found in rocks in the Himalayas – and humic shale – a similar organic substance to shilajit, but mined in mountainous regions in the US (like Utah) (1).

Substances like shilajit and humic shale have been used as an alternative remedy for thousands of years, including ayurvedic medicine – the oldest form of medicine in history. They were considered a coveted remedy due to their high content of Fulvic minerals.

Fulvic minerals are harvested from their orginal sources, substances like shilajit and humic shale.

Fulvic minerals are also called ‘Fulvic acids.’

 

What is Fulvic Acids?

Fulvic acids are a humic substance (2).

As stated above, Fulvic acids are fulvic minerals, and are harvested from organic, naturally occurring compounds. These compounds are common in soil, compost, humus, humic shale, and shilajit. Humic shale and shilajit containing the highest amount, around 15-20% Fulvic acid (2).

Fulvic acids have been used for thousands of years as a medicinal remedy for digestive ailments, nervous disorders, and even altitude sickness (2).

When processed into a supplement, fulvic acids are usually combined with other minerals (usually magnesium) and amino acids (2).

 

5 Benefits Of Fulvic Minerals In The Body

As stated above, Fulvic acid and minerals have shown potential to be a very beneficial aid when added to your daily diet.

It provides five main benefits to your health – boosting the immune system, decreasing inflammation, improving brain function, reducing fatigue, and aiding iron absorption.

 

  1. Boost the immune system

Fulvic acid has been shown to improve disease resistance by boosting immune defenses against viruses, bacteria, pathogens, and toxins (2).

It also strengthens antioxidant activity, helping protect against free radicals and oxidative stress that can lead to cellular damage and inflammation (2).

It also acts as an anti-inflammatory, antiallergen, promotes white blood cell action, and minimizes the release of inflammatory hormones (3).

 

  1. Decrease inflammation

Though inflammation is a natural body function for healing, there are times inflammation can become uncontrollable. Chronic inflammation increases stress and can lead to many unwanted diseases.

Because Fulvic minerals boost the immune system and the power of antioxidants in the body, reducing harmful inflammation to assist in disease prevention.

The acids promote an anti-inflammatory response to illness, delaying the release of inflammatory hormones (3).

 

  1. Improve brain function

Promoting brain function may be one of the benefits of Fulvic minerals (2).

It also promotes neurological brain function and  internal messaging to send sensory, motor, and cognitive messages.

Fulvic acids also improve ‘cognitive capacity,’ aka: memory; especially in older age (1, 2).

 

  1. Reduce fatigue

Along with improving brain function, Fulvic acid can also decrease tiredness associated with mild to extreme fatigue.

Severe bouts of fatigue have been linked to errors in mitochondrial function, reducing their ability to produce energy used by the body (1). With less energy to use, the body becomes worn-out and unable to perform day-to-day activities.

Fulvic acid intervenes at the mitochondrial to improve energy production and reduce fatigue (1).

 

  1. Aiding iron absorption

Iron deficiency occurs when too little iron is absorbed into the body. This can occur either genetically or with a reduced iron intake in the daily diet.

An iron deficiency can lead to anemia of the blood cells, as iron is an important component to carry oxygen throughout the body.

Fulvic acid may gradually assist in increasing iron levels in the body (1).

 

Dosage and possible side effects of Fulvic Minerals

Though Fulvic mineral supplements are considered generally safe to consume, but there is currently no specific, research-backed recommendations in terms of a specific dosage (2).

However, best practices from most medical professionals recommend an average maximum dose of 15 mL (0.5 oz) per day (2).

Consuming over this recommended threshold, like with any supplement, might possibility cause a variety of risks and/or side effects. Though, none specifically have been found.

It is recommended that those with an autoimmune disease and pregnant and breast-feeding women take extra precautions with Fulvic mineral supplements (4).

It’s important to seek advice from a medical professional if you experience any unusual side effects when adding a new Fulvic mineral supplement to your daily routine.

Could adding a Fulvic multimineral to your daily diet benefit your health?

As stated above, Fulvic acid can provide many benefits for the body when added to the daily diet.

If you are looking for a boost immune system and brain function, adding a supplement of Fulvic acid to your daily routine may help.

It is important to choose a Fulvic acid supplement from a reputable brand to ensure the supplement you are getting is high-quality and without harmful substances.

As always, seek the advice of a trusted medical professional when considering taking a new supplement, especially if you are experiencing side effects.

Author: Allison Lansman, RDN, LD

References

 

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/shilajit
  2. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/fulvic-acid
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6151376/
  4. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1320/fulvic-acid

 

Colloidal Minerals in natural grape juice

Colloidal Mineral Complex with over 70 Plant Derived Minerals – Natural Grape

Provides 450 mg of essential trace and macro minerals in natural grape juice.

942 in stock

$29.49

Colloidal Minerals 70 Plus Plant Derived Liquid Minerals – Unflavored

900 mg of colloidal minerals per serving, electrolytes and minerals.

480 in stock

$31.49

Buried Treasure Pure Colloidal Fulvic Minerals

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD),

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD), freelance nutrition and health writer, and wellness blogger. She is the owner/operator of The Freelance RD writing service and blog. Her business provides mainly writing services, but also product development, educational services and brand partnerships.

As an RD, Allison embraces a modern approach to nutrition and wellness. She believes we benefit most from building positive, balanced connections between mind, body, food, and environment. And she is passionate about sharing that philosophy through wellness communication and writing.

Her educational background is through Iowa State University, where she completed both her undergraduate degree and dietetics internship. She is currently studying towards an Masters in Public Health.

Posted on

7 Ways Vitamin C Keeps Your Body Healthy

7 Ways Vitamin C Keeps Your Body Healthy

 

Vitamin C is an important nutrient for keeping the body healthy.

It is also an essential vitamin, meaning it is not a nutrient the human body can produce. You have to eat vitamin C every day in your diet to make sure your body has enough of it for vital, daily functions.

If you aren’t getting enough vitamin C from your diet, dietary supplements are also available.

What is Vitamin C

Vitamin C—also known as ascorbic acid—is a water-soluble vitamin that is linked to several health benefits.

Its widely known for its high content in citrus fruits (i.e., oranges, lemons, or grapefruits) , but it can be found in an abundant number of colorful fruits and vegetables. Including papaya, kiwi, strawberries, kale, broccoli, and sweet potatoes (1).

7 ways vitamin C keeps the body healthy

As stated above, vitamin C plays a very important role in keep your body healthy.

It plays a key part in several vital body functions, which is why it needs to be consumed every day through diet or via dietary supplement.

Vitamin C supports a healthy immune system, functions as an antioxidant, quickens tissue healing, keeps bones strong, aids iron absorption, boost brain health, and promotes healthy aging.

  1. Keeps the immune system strong

Vitamin C is involved in many parts of the immune system.

It helps in the production of both white blood cells (lymphocytes and phagocytes) and antibodies. These cells help protect the body against viruses, infections, and illnesses (1).

Vitamin C is also part of the body’s first line of defense to disease and infection—the skin (and mucus membranes). Strong, healthy skin is an essential barrier for keeping out harmful bacteria. Vitamin C plays a role in producing collagen, which is a key protein for the structure of skin.

  1. Has antioxidant power

As an antioxidant, vitamin C can help protect your cells against the effects of harmful free radicals. Free radicals can cause serious harm to the body in the form of oxidative stress and inflammation (4).

It’s antioxidant properties also assist in maintaining skin health. When

Vitamin C is actively transported to the skin where it help strengthen the skin’s barriers and promote natural repair and rejuvenation to prevent weakness and signs of aging (1).

  1. Repairs and heals the skin

Vitamin C is essential for the growth, skin strengthening and defense, and repair of tissue all over the body due to its contribution to collagen production. Collagen is a key protein of skin tissue building.

This way, vitamin C keeps our skin strong, but also helps to heal tissue wounds (2). A higher intake of Vitamin C is associated with faster wound healing.

As stated above, as an antioxidant it also protects the skin from oxidative damage that can lead to weak tissue and to signs of ageing, like wrinkles (4).

  1. Keeps bones strong

Vitamin C’s role in collagen production is also important for bones. The protein is an essential component for bone mineralization, maintenance, and repair. But not only bones of the body, but also teeth and cartilage (2).

Higher intake of vitamin C is also linked to higher bone density (3). This is important for individuals of all ages, but especially for older adults. As we ages, bone density decreases and the risk for breakage and fracture increases.

It’s important to increase supplementation of vitamin C with age to maintain strong bones.

  1. Aids iron absorption

Iron is an important nutrient for several functions in the body. This includes making red blood cells. Red blood cells transport micronutrients and oxygen through the body, keeping it functioning properly.

Vitamin C helps convert these certain forms of iron – those found in plants that are poorly absorbed by the digestive system – into one that is easily absorbed by the body (1).

  1. Boost brain health, mood, and memory

The brain consumes a lot of vitamin C for it to function properly. It uses the highest concentration of vitamin C of any other body system.

Most important for brain health, is the role vitamin C plays in the nervous system (via neuron and neurotransmitter function), which is where it boosts brain power (5). It’s also needed for production of serotonin, which is important in regulating mood.

Adequate vitamin C intake is also important to keep the brain healthy as we age. Primarily with collagen production and its ability to support ‘cognitive capacity’ – AKA: memory.

  1. Promotes healthy aging

To age and remain healthy is important to prevent and stave off age-related diseases. And it’s also important to maintain an adequate intake of vital micronutrients.

Vitamin C is one of those nutrients because of its role in all the functions described above. An intake of vitamin C that meets the recommended daily amount (listed below) throughout the lifetime may help stave off several issues related to aging. Including frail bones and teeth, weakened and wrinkled skin, and some diseases (6).

Enough daily vitamin C can promote healthy aging over the lifetime.

What is the daily requirement of Vitamin C

The recommended daily amount of vitamin C is 90 mg for adult men and adult women, respectively (1).

Are you getting enough Vitamin C to keep your body healthy?

Because Vitamin C is a vital nutrient, it’s important to meet the suggested intake recommendations every day via diet or dietary supplements.

As mentioned, vitamin C found in citrus fruits, but it can be found in an abundant number of colorful fruits and vegetables. Including papaya, kiwi, strawberries, kale, broccoli, and sweet potatoes (1).

However, sometime you cannot consume enough vitamin C from diet alone. You can consult with a healthcare professional to discuss if you are consuming an adequate amount of vitamin C through your daily diet or if a supplement is needed.

Vitamin C – in the form of ascorbic acid or others, including sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate, other mineral ascorbates, and ascorbic acid with bioflavonoids – can be found in most multivitamins, but is also available alone as a dietary individual supplement (7).

Always insure you are using reputable companies to source your vitamin C supplements.

 

Author: Allison Lansman, RDN, LD

 

References

 

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-c-benefits#section5
  2. https://www.eatright.org/food/vitamins-and-supplements/types-of-vitamins-and-nutrients/how-vitamin-c-supports-a-healthy-immune-system
  3. https://americanbonehealth.org/nutrition/vitamins-for-bone-health/
  4. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/antioxidants-explained#free-radicals
  5. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/articles/201801/the-cognitive-benefits-vitamin-c
  6. https://www.sunriseseniorliving.com/blog/april-2019/vitamin-c-and-the-role-it-plays-in-healthy-aging.aspx
  7. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-Consumer/

High Potency Supplements Rich in Vitamin C

250 mg Vitamin C

$27.49

154 in stock

Buried Treasure ACF Advanced Immune Response all natural immune support and wellness

1,000 mg Vitamin C

$31.49

544 in stock

1,200 mg Vitamin C

$30.49

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD),

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD), freelance nutrition and health writer, and wellness blogger. She is the owner/operator of The Freelance RD writing service and blog. Her business provides mainly writing services, but also product development, educational services and brand partnerships.

As an RD, Allison embraces a modern approach to nutrition and wellness. She believes we benefit most from building positive, balanced connections between mind, body, food, and environment. And she is passionate about sharing that philosophy through wellness communication and writing.

Her educational background is through Iowa State University, where she completed both her undergraduate degree and dietetics internship. She is currently studying towards an Masters in Public Health.

Posted on

Zinc: 5 Benefits of Zinc, Sources, and Daily Requirements

Zinc: 5 Benefits of Zinc, Sources, and Daily Requirements

Zinc is a micronutrient that’s vital for keeping your body healthy. It’s an ‘essential’ mineral, meaning the body cannot produce it. This means you must consume zinc every day in the diet or from dietary supplements.

 

What is Zinc

Zinc is an essential mineral found in several foods, including meats, shellfish, legumes, dairy, eggs, whole grains, some vegetables (potatoes and kale), and seeds and nuts (1). However, it can also be consumed via dietary supplements if the diet is low in zinc-containing foods.

This micronutrient is a vital nutrient for several body functions. These include supporting a healthy immune system, keeping bones strong, aiding in healing, helps in iron absorption, functioning as an antioxidant, and promoting healthy aging.

 

5 Benefits of Zinc

 

  1. Boosts the immune system

Zinc is involved in many parts of the immune system and keeping immunity strong.

It is critical for immune cell development and function. Zinc is necessary for immune cell function (i.e., white blood cells like lymphocytes and phagocytes) (2). These cells help protect the body against infections and illnesses.

Because of this, a deficiency in zinc can cause a delayed immune response.

 

  1. Aids wound healing and tissue repair

Zinc is essential for cell growth, making it a key component in tissue repair.

Along with vitamin C, zinc plays an important role in the production of collagen. Collagen is a key protein for skin tissue construction (2).

Because of this, adequate to higher levels of zinc in the diet is connect to increased rate of tissue repair and wound healing.

 

  1. Functions as an antioxidant

Zinc is also an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent.

This mineral protects cells from damage by free radicals, but also decreases oxidative stress. Oxidative stress contributes to chronic inflammation, which can contribute to the development of several age-related diseases (3).

However, several studies in older population have shown the positive effect of decreasing markers of inflammation and damage to cells.

 

  1. May benefit memory and boost learning

 

Zinc plays an important role in neuron function, especially in the hippocampus. The hippocampus is the section of the brain responsible for long-term and spatial memory (2).

Although this subject has limited research, an adequate amount of zinc has been shown to benefit the function of memory. Also, aid in the ability to learn and store this information in long-term memory (4).

However, it is important to note that an excess or toxicity of zinc may also have the opposite effect on the brain; so it’s important to ensure you are not overconsuming this mineral.

 

  1. May help clarify skin

The clinical trials associated to zinc and acne are also limited, but from the research that has been done has shown a positive outcome of zinc and its ability to clarify skin.

As an antibacterial agent, zinc can hinder bacteria that cause acne breakouts. Also, its anti-inflammatory properties can reduce redness and pain associated with moderate to severe acne (5).

 

What is the daily requirement of Zinc

The recommended daily amount (DRI) of zinc is 11mg for adult men and 8 mg for adult women (2).

This requirement increases for certain groups, including pregnant women (11mg) and breastfeeding women (12mg).

 

Risks of Zinc deficiency and toxicity

Zinc is an important mineral for many functions of the body, but like any micronutrient, there are always risks of deficiency. And of the opposite end, there is also the possibility of toxicity. Though both deficiency and toxicity are rare, it’s important to understand that the risks of each.

Not meeting the recommended daily amount of zinc can lead to deficiency. Symptoms include (2):

 

  • Impaired growth and development
  • Skin rashes
  • Weakened immune system
  • Slow wound healing

 

On the opposite side, toxicity can occur with mega doses of zinc. Just like deficiency, too much zinc can cause health complications and negative side effects.

Indicators that you may be consuming (via diet or complement) too much zinc can include (2):

 

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Headache and cramps
  • Reduced immune function

 

What are the best sources of Zinc?

Because zinc is an essential nutrient, it’s important to meet the suggested intake recommendations every day via diet or dietary supplement.

As mentioned, zinc found in a variety of foods — meats, shellfish, animal by-products, and some vegetables.

However, if you are having difficulties meeting your zinc daily intake requirements through your diet, supplements are also recommended. Zinc can be found in most multivitamins, but is also available as a solitary supplement.

Always insure you are using reputable companies to source your zinc supplements.

Also, consult with a healthcare professional to discuss if you are consuming an adequate amount of zinc through your daily diet.

Author: Allison Lansman, RDN, LD

 

References

 

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/best-foods-high-in-zinc
  2. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/zinc
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4429650/
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561272/
  5. https://www.healthline.com/health/beauty-skin-care/zinc-for-acne

Recommended Supplements with Zinc

3 mg Zinc (Gluconate)

154 in stock

$27.49

Buried Treasure Hair, Skin and Nails Plus is the liquid nutritional supplement your body needs for stronger nails, lustrous hair and vibrant skin.

7.5 mg Zinc (Zinc Citrate)

52 in stock

$57.49

VM100 Highest Potency Liquid Multi Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Available

15 mg Zinc (Zinc Citrate)

283 in stock

$42.49

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD),

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD), freelance nutrition and health writer, and wellness blogger. She is the owner/operator of The Freelance RD writing service and blog. Her business provides mainly writing services, but also product development, educational services and brand partnerships.

As an RD, Allison embraces a modern approach to nutrition and wellness. She believes we benefit most from building positive, balanced connections between mind, body, food, and environment. And she is passionate about sharing that philosophy through wellness communication and writing.

Her educational background is through Iowa State University, where she completed both her undergraduate degree and dietetics internship. She is currently studying towards an Masters in Public Health.

Posted on

Vitamins and Minerals for Kids: Knowing Daily Nutrient Needs

Vitamins and Minerals for Kids: Knowing daily nutrient needs & determining a reliable multivitamin for your child

Vitamins and Minerals for Kids: Knowing Daily Nutrient Needs & Determining a Reliable Multivitamin for Your Child

Childhood is an important time for growth. It’s a vital time for mental development, motor skills, and physical growth. And as children grow, its necessary that they are receiving all the proper nutrition from a balanced diet to ensure optimal health.

This includes essential nutrients such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, but also fundamental minerals and vitamins for development.

Daily nutrient needs for children

Though everyone needs the same type of nutrients — such as vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, protein and fat. However, the daily needs of these nutrients for children is vastly different than those for adults, which is reflective of the smaller body size coupled with rapid physical growth and mental development.

Nutrient needs for children are dependent on age, sex, size, growth, and activity level. According to the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for young children, energy requirements between the ages of 2 and 8 are 1,000–1,400 calories each day. Those ages 9–13 need 1,400–2,600 calories daily with some variation (1). Other micronutrients (calcium, iron, and vitamins A, C, D, B12), important for development also have DRIs for children.

 

Resources like the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPlate provides simple yet detailed healthy eating recommendations for children. Components of a child’s balanced diet should include all of the follows at every meal (2) —

 

  • Vegetables – Are low in calories and high in fiber. Vitamins and minerals abundant in vegetables are vitamins A, C, and E, magnesium, zinc, potassium, phosphorous, and folic acid.
  • Fruits – Much like vegetables, fruits are low in calories, high in fiber, and contain many of the same vitamins and minerals.
  • Grains – Whole grains are the type of grains to focus on for a child’s diet. Micronutrients high in grains include B vitamins, iron, and magnesium.
  • Proteins – Lean proteins are most known for their high availability of Vitamin B6, B12, and folic acid.
  • Dairy – Liquids like milk are beneficial when it comes to growth, containing vitamins A, D, and B12, calcium, potassium, and phosphorous.

 

4 essential vitamins and minerals for children’s development

 

There are several micronutrients that are essential for proper growth. However, there are five that are essential for development.

  • Calcium – Calcium is an important building block for bone tissue. This mineral is most commonly found in dairy products, but can also be found in certain fruits and vegetables. Too little calcium in the early years can cause bone density issues and prevent children from reaching their full potential height as adults.
  • Iron –Iron is involved in brain development in early life and is found in several vegetables and animal products or by-products. Lack of iron causes a condition called iron deficiency anemia (IDA) that results in growth and cognitive retardation (3).
  • Vitamin D – Much like calcium, vitamin D is involved in bone formation and growth via growth hormone (GH). Vitamin D is normally fortified in many calcium-rich food sources, like daily products. A deficiency in vitamin D can lead to lack of bone mineralization, hence weak bones.
  • B Vitamins –Vitamin B is crucial for brain development in early life; primarily B6 (folate) and B12. These vitamins are most abundant in animal products or by-products. Children who lack the recommended intake of B6 and B12 are at risk for developmental delays, anorexia, or neurological

 

Multivitamins for children

Even when children are consuming the recommended DRIs, they may need to add a multivitamin. Supplementing multivitamins into the diet ensures meeting the body’s need to carry out developmental functions.

There are also certain categories of children who should be using multivitamins on a regular basis to ensure their daily intake of essential vitamins and minerals are being met. These are children who are at risk for nutrient deficiencies, including those who are (1):

 

  • Extremely picky eaters (or struggle to eat a variety of fortified foods)
  • On a vegetarian or vegan diet
  • Suffering from a condition that affects the absorption of or increases the need for nutrients, (i.e., food allergies, celiac disease,  cystic fibrosis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD))
  • Have had surgery that impacts their digestive system (stomach and/or intestines)

Dietary preferences, like vegetarianism, or veganism, that lack a variety of food types and/or animal products are at risk of calcium, iron, zinc, and vitamins B12 and D deficiencies (1).  Also, children with gastrointestinal diseases are at risk for deficiencies of several different vitamins and minerals, including iron, zinc, vitamin D, and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) (1).

Nutrient deficiencies and malnutrition during childhood can lead to serious consequences over time, like abnormal or stunted growth or developmental delays. But this can be avoided by supplementing a child’s diet with reliable multivitamin.

 

Purchasing a reliable multivitamin for your child

If you believe your child is failing to grow both physically and developmentally and are suspecting a nutrient deficiency, you may want to look into a reliable multivitamin for your child.

When selecting a reliable multivitamin, ensure your ultimate choice is high-quality, designed for your child’s age group, and doesn’t provide more than 100% of the Daily Value of vitamins and minerals (4).

 

In addition, ensure you keep multivitamins out of your child’s reach and invest time in educating your child on multivitamin use. Education is especially important if you purchase the gummy-style multivitamin, which can be mistaken for candy (leading to potential toxicity).

Seek advice from a medical professional

It’s important to note that while several are picky eaters, many common foods — like breakfast cereal, milk, and orange juice — are fortified with key nutrients, such as B vitamins, vitamin D, calcium and iron (4). Due to this your child may be getting more vitamins and minerals than you assume, which is why you want to be cautious of vitamin and mineral megadoses. These can be toxic, especially for fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K that are stored in body fat (1).

Consult with a healthcare professional to discuss if you are consuming an adequate amount of the recommended vitamins and minerals through your daily diet.

And as always, if you are experiencing any of negative reactions and/or if a(n) multivitamin may interact with medications your child takes, seek out the advice of a medical professional immediately.

Author: Allison Lansman, RDN, LD

 

References

 

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamins-for-kids
  2. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/myplate.html
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12708125
  4. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/multivitamins/faq-20058310

 

Children's Daily Liquid Multivitamin & Minerals Nutritional Dietary Supplement

Buried Treasure Children’s Daily Liquid Multivitamin and Mineral Supplement

  • Buried Treasure Children’s Daily Multivitamin and Minerals
  • DV of essential vitamins, minerals in a non-gmo whole food plant sourced supplement
  • Free from gluten, dairy, wheat and yeast.

950 in stock

$24.49

Buy 2 for free shipping!

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD),

Allison Lansman is a Registered Dietitian (RD), freelance nutrition and health writer, and wellness blogger. She is the owner/operator of The Freelance RD writing service and blog. Her business provides mainly writing services, but also product development, educational services and brand partnerships.

As an RD, Allison embraces a modern approach to nutrition and wellness. She believes we benefit most from building positive, balanced connections between mind, body, food, and environment. And she is passionate about sharing that philosophy through wellness communication and writing.

Her educational background is through Iowa State University, where she completed both her undergraduate degree and dietetics internship. She is currently studying towards an Masters in Public Health.

Posted on

Buried Treasure Hydrating Sports Drink Recipe

Buried Treasure Hydrating Sports Drink Recipe

Andrew and Matthew demonstrate a new Buried Treasure recipe – Acai Complete with Pure Minerals for a real hydrating, refreshing ‘sports drink’.   Buried Treasure Acai Complete is made from organic Acai, organic Pomegranate with Goji Berry and our Ultra Berry blend.   Buried Treasure Pure Minerals is sourced from humic shale which contains over 70 trace minerals and essential electrolytes.   

This recipe eliminates all artificial colors, ingredients and flavorings.   This Buried Treasure recipe also is low in sugar but high in antioxidants and electrolytes.    Acai Complete naturally gives an energy boost with 16,000 mg of antioxidants.   Pure Minerals contains 900 mg of over 70 trace minerals.    

Our new sports drink recipe will help to replenish, rehydrate and refresh!   

Recipe:

4 oz of Buried Treasure Acai Complete

4 oz of Buried Treasure Pure Colloidal Minerals

64 oz of water plus ice

Makes 4 16 oz servings.   

Suggestions:  add splash of natural lemon juice for Vitamin C and added flavor

 

 

Posted on

Vitamin E

Vitamin E liquid vitamins for health and wellness

Vitamin E

Vitamin E comprises a combination of 8 different compounds (4 tocopherols and 4 tocotrienols) that exhibit vitamin E activity. The tocopherols include isomer alpha-tocopherol, beta-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol and omega-tocopherols. They are all derivatives of tocol or 6-hydroxy chromane ring with phytyl side chain. All the tocopherols are alkaline sensitive, and their vitamin activity is destroyed through oxidation. Of all the tocopherols, alpha-tocopherol is the most potent and widely distributed in nature.  Vitamin E is only found in plant dietary sources such as oils, nuts, grains, wheat and fruits. Therefore, excessive cooking and food processing may destroy vitamin E to some extent. It is fats-soluble hence, stored in the body and used as needed. Each isomer of vitamin E confers unique properties and hence functions and applications especially in the manufacture of food and beverage products.  To begin with, the dietary tocopherols maintain cell integrity by functioning as antioxidants and free radical scavengers. It also prevents the peroxidation of membrane lipids especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of membrane phospholipids.

 Vitamin E supports the immune system.  First, it has the ability to reduce free radical damage and promote healthy inflammation response which confers its immune supportive function. As an antioxidant, vitamin E protects cells from damage. The alpha-tocopherols present in the membrane protect membrane lipids from radical attacks to cause a change in membrane structure.  The damaging of body cells increases susceptibility to invasion by foreign bodies. Vitamin E therefore acts as a chain breaking antioxidant. The antioxidant function is also helpful when exposed to risk factors such as ultra violet light or cigarette smoke. Its antioxidation function also, balances cholesterol preventing its transforming to a toxic form.

Additionally, vitamin E plays a role in the maintenance of muscle tone. Most of the vitamin E is normally stored in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. It also has a metabolic role that ensures optimal body functioning. Vitamin E notably   prevents hormonal imbalance especially the nervous and endocrine systems.  In addition, Vitamin E supports spermatogenesis.

Vitamin E is beneficial to the skin as it strengthens the capillary walls and therefore, their moisture and elasticity. Additionally, it enhances the healing process of the skin by speeding up cell regeneration. It is absorbed by the epidermal layer of the skin. As such, vitamin E slows down the aging process and aids in improvement of athletic performance such as running by reducing the oxidative stress on muscles post exercise.  Vitamin E counteracts the formation of free radicals that weaken and break down healthy cells hence promoting longevity.

Other therapeutic uses of vitamin E include the ability to induce apoptosis. This helps in the elimination of damaged cells or DNA thus minimizing errors. Modified Vitamin E is  that proaptotic agent that is  used in the process of   eliminating such cells.

Vitamin E deficiency is rare. The daily requirement for an adult is up to 10mg per day. However, during states of increased physiological needs such as in pregnancy or during lactation the amount increases to about 12-13mg/day.  It entails a deficiency in intake of all the isomers. At times Vitamin E toxicity may occur due to self-medication with large doses of vitamin E.

Posted on

Vitamin B6 Pyridoxine

Vitamin B6 Pyridoxine

Vitamin B 6 is also known as pyridoxine.  It is involved in a wide range of metabolic, developmental and physiologic processes. The three compounds that show vitamin B6 activity include pyridoxine, pyridoxal and pyridoxamine. All these molecules are present in food and are converted to pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) the most active form of vitamin B 6. Pyridoxine is stable to heat and sensitive to heat and alkali. Pyridoxal phosphate the active form of vitamin B6 gives vitamin B6 its various functions. It has a wide array of functions; it acts as a prosthetic group or coenzyme of various enzymes involved in metabolic processes such as transamination, decarboxylation, transsulfaration, desulfaration and non-oxidative deamination reactions. It also plays an essential role in the synthesis of heme, niacin, neurotransmitter, connective tissues, and sphingolipids in nerve sheaths as elaborated.

To begin with, pyridoxine functions as an enzymatic co-factor. It is a suitable cofactor for various biochemical reactions due to its water solubility and high reactivity when phosphorylated.  VitB6 takes part in more than 140 enzymatic reactions.   Most of the PLP-dependent enzymes catalyze important steps in the amino acid metabolism,  for instance co-catalyzing transamination, racemization, decarboxylation, and  alpha ,beta-elimination reactions.  A good example of PLP cofactor function is  in the regulation of steroid hormone action.

Apart from its function as a potent cofactor for PLP-dependent enzymes, pyridoxine is also thought to act directly as a protective agent against free radicals such as reactive oxygen species, like singlet oxygen hence playing a significant role as an antioxidant.  In fact, Vitamin B 6 is more potent than tocopherols or carotenoids in its ability to neutralize the reactive oxygen species.  As such, it prevents damage to the cellular membranes that can result in reversible cell death and hence harm the body.

It is also essential in the formation of neurotransmitters such as GABA, serotonin and catecholamines..  For instance, pyridoxal phosphate acts as a co-enzyme of glutamate de-carboxylase that converts glutamate to gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA).Deficiency therefore, results in seizures in children due to decreased formation of the neurotransmitters. However, in high amounts it can cause nerve damage. In children especially it is necessary for the normal development of the central nervous system.

Vitamin B6 in the form of PLP is necessary for the metabolism of proteins, sugar and fatty acids as well. This occurs through the transfer of amino and sulfur groups. Vital polyunsaturated fatty acids are synthesized through the desaturation of linoleic acid and gamma linolenic acid. Storage carbohydrates such as glycogen are broken down under the cofactor activity of PLP. It also has an immunosupportive function. It is necessary for a healthy immune system. Pyridoxine is also crucial for mounting an effective immune response through stimulation of the immune cells. Deficiency in pyridoxine has been shown to alter the immune response.

Pyridoxine is also important for the cardiovascular health.  Just like folates and cobalamines, it helps to reduce the levels of homocsyteine an intermediate in methionine metabolism.  A PLP dependent enzyme helps convert homocsyteine to methionine. Homocysteine is considered a risk factor for atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis. Also has a role in reduction of high blood pressure.

 Vitamin B 6 is essential for the activation of glycine in the initial stages of heme production which makes it a key molecule in the formation of hemoglobin. As such, deficiency could result in anemia. Vitamin B 6 is also essential for growth and maintaining a healthy skin. Deficiency may result in poor skin health such as the occurrence of skin lesions.

Indeed, pyridoxine is essential for   the cellular metabolism and general well-being of all living organism. The recommended daily allowance in adults is mainly determined by the amount of protein intake. For adults, it is a minimum of 2 mg of B6 per 100grams of consumed protein, whereas in children it ranges from 0.6 to 1.2 mg per 100 grams of protein. Nonetheless, pyridoxine deficiency is rare.

Posted on

Are you missing out on essential minerals?

Are you missing out on essential minerals?

Did you know that a carrot you eat today contains far less vitamins and minerals than a carrot did back in 1970? Our modern agricultural practices have stripped the soil of nutrients, which means the fruits and vegetables we eat are gradually getting less nutritious.

That combined with the fact that 90 percent of Americans don’t eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables anyway, means that many of us aren’t getting enough of the minerals we need to stay healthy.

There are two types of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your body needs a lot of, like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride and sulfur. Trace minerals are minerals your body only needs in small doses, like iron, manganese, copper, iodine, zinc, cobalt, fluoride and selenium.

Our bodies use minerals for so many important functions. In fact, minerals contribute to almost every aspect of your health. They’re used to make hormones and enzymes. They’re also critical to keeping your heart, muscles, bones and brains in working order. So, how do you make sure you’re not missing out on essential minerals?

One way to get more minerals is to eat more mineral-rich foods, like fruits, vegetables and whole grains. But like we mentioned above, these foods contain far less minerals than they once did. They’re still an important source of minerals for your body. But it’s a lot harder nowadays to eat enough of these foods to get all the minerals you need. So, where else can you get your minerals?

How about from prehistoric plant material?

That sounds far-fetched at first. But a form of prehistoric plant material called humic shale is becoming more popular with health-conscious people who want to make sure they’re getting their minerals. In fact, we offer a supplement that contains minerals derived from humic shale, because we believe in it’s benefits. Humic shale, which is mined in Utah, contains the same minerals you’ll find in fruits and vegetables. Minerals derived from humic shale are also water-soluble, which makes them easy for your body to absorb.

There’s one more factor to consider if you want to make sure you’re getting enough minerals…how much you exercise. When you sweat, you release minerals known as electrolytes. If you exercise (or sweat) a lot, your body’s electrolyte supply can become depleted.

That’s why so many people drink sports beverages (like Gatorade and Powerade) that contain electrolytes after exercising. But these drinks also contain tons of sugar, artificial colors, artificial flavors and artificial sweeteners. Plus, they contain a bunch of calories that counteract the calories you just burned with your workout.

So, how about ditching that brightly-colored sports drink for something simpler and healthier? You could try our Concord Grape Mineral Complex. It tastes as good as Gatorade, without loads of sugar and artificial ingredients. Plus, it contains 70 minerals derived from humic shale, that prehistoric plant material we were just telling you about.  

However you choose to get your minerals, be certain to get enough. The FDA offers a handy chart that tells you how much of each mineral you need and where to get them. You can use it as a guide to make sure you’re not missing out on any health-protecting minerals.

Posted on

Iodine

iodine supplement uses and benefits

Iodine

Iodine is one of the mineral elements that is required not only for thyroid functioning but also for general optimal body functioning. In fact, it is needed in extra thyroidal areas in larger amounts than the thyroid gland itself. Nonetheless, the primary role of the iodine is the syntheses of thyroid hormones .The ovaries hold the second highest concentration of iodine after the thyroid. Receptors for iodine uptake are also found in the skin, gastric mucosa, adrenal gland, heart, thymus, lung kidney bladder, mammary gland, salivary glands and the breast. As such, iodine is essential. This is due to the fact that Iodine cannot be synthesized naturally by the body. It is therefore an essential element in the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Good sources include iodized salt or sea weed. Therefore, iodine not only confers thyroidal uses but also extrathyroidal benefits as well.

Iodine  is essential for thyroid functioning as it helps in the conversion of  thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH)  to triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine(T4) which are the biologically active forms of  thyroid hormone.  Notably, thyroid hormones are involved in various functions in the body such as regulation of metabolism, bone health, mounting an immune response and development of the central nervous system.

Iodine also helps regulate the immune system as it helps fight infections. In addition, iodine can enhance the immune function by helping remove both toxic chemical toxins and biological toxins. Additionally, iodine is effective in suppressing autoimmunity which keeps immunity in check. It also protects against bodies invasion by foreign organisms especially in the stomach. In addition, Iodine reinforces T-cell adaptive immune system.

Just like vitamin C Iodine functions as an antioxidizing agent. It is important for raising the total serum antioxidant capacity.  Iodine neutralizes reactive oxygen species such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical that have the potential to destroy the cellular membranes. Iodide specifically scavenges for hydroxyl radicals. Besides, experimental models have shown that iodine prevents lipid peroxidation in brain cells of rats. It does this by attaching to the double bonds of the polyunsarurated fatty acids in the cellular membranes thus rendering them less susceptible to free radicals.

Iodine induces apoptosis which entails programmed cells death, an important process in regulating body growth and development. Take for instance, the formation of fingers in the growing fetus is through apoptosis of the tissue between them. Additionally, it helps destroy harmful cells in the body such as mutated or infected cells.

Iodine supports cardiac function and cardiovascular health. As it is, sufficient levels of iodine are required to maintain a stable rhythmic heartbeat. Besides, it is directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of the levels of the serum cholesterol levels and hence maintenance of the blood pressure.

Skin health and functioning is also influenced by iodine. According to research, the ability to sweat is influenced by iodine. Low levels of iodine stores prevent sweating. Iodine also plays a crucial role in glucose metabolism. Iodine has shown the ability to attach itself to insulin receptors hence improving glucose metabolism.   As such, iodine is important for both physical and mental growth. The thyroid hormones are required for proper brain and bone development during pregnancy and early infancy. Iodine is crucial for the development of the central nervous system.

Indeed, iodine not only has a role in the synthesis and functioning of the thyroid hormones but also has a direct impact on all the other tissues that utilize iodine. An excessive of iodine or deficiency of it is harmful to the body. Inadequate intake means that the body cannot produce enough amount of thyroid hormone. Iodine deficiency is rare since table salt is iodized. The average daily intake of iodine in the United States averages 240 mcg that is well within the normal range of 150-299 mcg/day.

Posted on

Chromium

Chromium

Chromium is a naturally occurring element that is found in plants, rocks, soil, and animals.  It is an important trace element, with the human body containing about 6 mg of chromium. Chromium exists in diet both as organic and inorganic complexes. It is absorbed in the small intestine mucosa. Absorption is low and is enhanced by vitamin C and vitamin B. Storage of the absorbed chromium occurs in the liver, spleen, bone and soft tissue. Chromium occurs in three valence states, divalent Chromium (II), trivalent chromium (III) and   hexavalent chromium (VI). Of the three forms, trivalent chromium is the biologically active compound and is derived from food sources. Notably, chromium is biologically active as part of an oligopeptide known as chromodulin. One of the biological functions of chromium is that it interacts with thyroid metabolism in humans.

Notably, trivalent Cr is the most stable form in biological systems since it does not penetrate biological membranes easily. It is required in the body in trace amounts. On the other hand, hexavalent chromium is toxic both to the environment and the body since it can easily penetrate cellular membranes to damage lipids, proteins and DNA hence carries a high health risk. Divalent chromium, Cr 2 functions as a strong reducing agent.  It is readily oxidized to Cr3. This is the reason why divalent Cr does not exist in biological systems. As such, trivalent chromium is the nutritionally useful form of chromium.

First, chromium plays a role in the regulation of blood glucose levels by increasing insulin receptors  and insulin-receptor interaction. It does this by enhancing the action of insulin, which functions to reduce the blood glucose levels. Trivalent chromium can therefore be used to correct glucose intolerance and insulin resistance as demonstrated in animal experiments. It also influences the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat and protein. As such, trivalent chromium is useful in achieving glucose tolerance.

Trivalent chromium is also directly involved in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. It also helps in reducing the total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as the triglyceride levels as part of lipid metabolism in individuals with elevated cholesterol. Additionally, studies have shown that it helps increase the levels of apolipoprotein A, a component of high density lipoprotein, which forms good cholesterol. It also increases transcription thus promoting protein synthesis. Through its action on insulin it can also influence lipid metabolism. Therefore, chromium has the ability to lower LDL levels and increase the HDL levels especially in people with high cholesterol levels. Therefore, chromium may be used to achieve a lean body mass and reduce body fat.

Chromium also takes part in hormonal regulation. For instance, it acts as a co-factor of insulin.  Chromium potentiates the effect of insulin by facilitating insulin biding to the receptors on the cell surface. Notably, Cr demand increases during conditions of stress. Elevated cortisol levels during stress act as an antagonist to insulin leading to increased blood glucose concentration and reduction in glucose use by peripheral tissues. Consequently, there is mobilization of Cr reserves. The ability to change sensitivity on insulin also has a role in reproduction.

Chromium has an immune function as well. It has intracellular and intercellular action through potentiating effects of humoral and cellular immunity. In addition, niacin bound trivalent Cr has shown a cardioprotective function and also increases energy levels. However, in high concentrations chromium is cardiotoxic.

Some of the dietary sources of chromium include meat, whole grain products, some fruits and vegetables. Foods containing simple sugars such as sucrose and fructose are low in chromium. It is worth noting that all forms of chromium can be toxic at high levels.  However, hexavalent Cr is more toxic than trivalent Cr as aforementioned. Inhalation of high levels of hexavalent Cr causes irritation to the lungs, nose, lung and stomach.